• 1-Centennial
  • 2-Classical
  • 3-Dance
  • 4-Broadway
  • 5-Film
  • 6-LastJudgement
 
     
  CALENDAR

May 21, 2013
Listen to the Jerome Moross Centenary Celebration on WHRB Radio
Tune in to WHRB, Harvard Radio Broadcasting, 95.3 FM, Boston for 9 hours of Jerome Moross's music. To listen to live audio streaming, visit www.whrb.org.
Program to include Frankie and Johnny, The Last Judgement, The Golden Apple, Hollywood favorites, and more.

June 5, 2013
Robert Black: Modern American Bass @ Kilbourn Hall Performs the Moross Bass Sonatina
Rochester, NY

June 25, 2013
German Premiere of Moross's The Last Judgement
Performed by Duo Ping and Ting at Twin Pack Piano Fastival
Hannover Music Academy
For more information, email "mail@Genova-Dimitrov.com"

August 26, 2013
Hollywood Rhapsody at the Proms
John Wilson Orchestra
John Wilson, Conductor
Program includes theme to The Big Country
Royal Albert Hall
London, UK
Click here for more information.

August 27, 2013
Screening of "The Big Country" with special guest appearance of Susanna Moross Tarjan
Showtime: 7 PM
The Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival at Cinema Paradiso
Click here for more information.

SAVE THE DATE October 15, 2013 at 6 PM
Celebrating the Centennial of Jerome Moross in Honor of Sid Ramin
Columbia University
Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Butler Library Room 523
Reception and viewing of the exhibition "Celebrating Composers"
For more information, e-mail Jennifer B. Lee at jbl100@columbia.edu

March 8, 2014
Society for American Music
40th Annual Conference
A Centennial Commemoration of Jerome Moross
Click here for more information.

April 26. 27, 2014
Buffalo Philharmonic
JoAnn Falletta, Conductor
Moross Symphony No.1
http://bpo.org

 

 
INTRODUCING
GENTLEMEN BE SEATED!



Next year, 2016, is the 60th anniversary of the completion of the Jerome Moross-Edward Eager musical, GENTLEMEN, BE SEATED! It was commissioned by producer Roger Stevens to tell the history of the Civil War through song and dance. There were three performances produced in 1963 by New York City Opera, starring Dick Shawn and performed at City Center. As part of the Moross.com website, a microsite has been added, dedicated to GENTLEMEN, BE SEATED! It is a production that is at once controversial and topical, yet timeless. You are invited to explore the contents of this microsite and discover a musical arguably ahead of its time and one that may well represent one of the most unique contributions to the genre. To enter the site, click here

DISCOVER AND REDISCOVER
THE MOROSS-LATOUCHE OPERA
FOR BROADWAY



The first full-length recording of THE GOLDEN APPLE coming in June

PS Classics, the label dedicated to the heritage of Broadway and American popular song, will release the first full-length recording of Jerome Moross & John Latouche’s classic 1954 musical THE GOLDEN APPLE, the first off-Broadway musical to win the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Musical. To enter the site, click here

INNOVATIVE COMPOSER FOR FILM, THEATER, CONCERT HALL REMEMBERED

by Jon Burlingame

Jerome Moross forever changed the sound of Western movies with his classic, Oscar-nominated score for The Big Country in 1958. But he was also an innovator in the musical theater, in ballet and in other musical realms. His Broadway show The Golden Apple was a landmark achievement combining opera with musical comedy; and he consistently surprised critics and audiences alike with his fresh approaches in the worlds of chamber and symphonic music as well.

Born on August 1, 1913, in Brooklyn, he graduated at age 18 from New York University, and in the 1930s was a member of Aaron Copland's Young Composers Group. Yet, as Christopher Palmer points out in his The Composer in Hollywood, Moross, "independently of his friend Copland, sought to develop an authentically American nationalist idiom which was not exclusively jazz-orientated but drew nourishment from a great variety of American folk and popular music cultures: musical comedy, vaudeville, folksong of the Appalachian mountain variety, spirituals, blues, rags and stomps."

For that reason, Moross's music is quintessentially American in richness and flavor. It feels inevitably rooted in American musical traditions. The composer moved back and forth across the continent during the 1940s, '50s and '60s, writing for concerts, radio, theater, and movies whenever Hollywood would call; he orchestrated Copland's scores for Our Town and The North Star, as well as Hugo Friedhofer's Americana-infused score for The Best Years of Our Lives.

Starting in 1948, he began getting film assignments of his own, culminating a decade later in his masterpiece, The Big Country, a sprawling Western directed by William Wyler and starring Gregory Peck, Charlton Heston, Carroll Baker and Jean Simmons. "For this film," says Mariana Whitmer, executive director of the Society for American Music (and author of a book-length study of the score), "Moross intentionally defied the familiar notions of how a Western should be accompanied and composed an imposing symphonic score that continues to inspire film composers."

Film-music historian John Caps cited "the authentic folk-song quality of the score, intentional and quantifiable," finding the music "rhythmically alive... [containing] that maverick, reckless, runaway pulse" that helped to define it as belonging to the American West. Palmer declared its rhythms "sturdy, muscular, rugged, sprung of the native soil. Moross's musical language – its tunes, its chords, its rhythms, its structure – is basically very simple. It is also personal to Moross."

Moross' score, recognized with an Academy Award nomination, redefined the sound of the Western. "Moross captures the sense of wide-open spaces and the grandeur of the Old West with a style that will be ably assimilated by Elmer Bernstein [and other composers] in the 1960s," adds author Roger Hickman in his book Reel Music: Exploring 100 Years of Film Music. And it brought more offers to Moross, whose other Westerns included The Proud Rebel (1958),The Jayhawkers (1959), The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1960) and the themes for television's popular Wagon Train (1959) and Lancer (1968).

He scored films in other genres, including the thriller The Sharkfighters (1956), the Cinerama travelogue Seven Wonders of the World (1956), the medieval drama The War Lord (1965), the cowboys-versus-dinosaurs fantasy The Valley of Gwangi (1969) and Paul Newman's sensitive drama Rachel, Rachel (1968). But his other magnum opus in film, The Cardinal (1963), was a globe-spanning epic about the Catholic Church that combined reverent themes, Viennese waltzes and, of course, vintage Americana as only Moross could have provided. At director Otto Preminger's insistence, Moross went on location throughout Europe with the film.

But Moross was far from solely a film composer. He was constantly experimenting in every musical genre. His ballet Frankie and Johnny (1938) drew on folk themes; his Ballet Ballads (1948) combined ballet and theater; and his remarkable The Golden Apple (1954) (with librettist and lyricist John Latouche) won the New York Drama Critics' Circle Award for Best Musical and, according to reviewers at the time, was nothing short of brilliant. It was a retelling of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey myths set in turn-of-the-century Washington state and anticipated the sung-through musical years before it became popular. Its best-known song is "Lazy Afternoon," introduced by Kaye Ballard and since covered by everyone from Barbra Streisand to Tony Bennett.

He composed his first and only symphony during the war years. As Buffalo Philharmonic conductor JoAnn Falletta recently observed, "Moross used traditional forms... in music that was intrinsically American. Reminiscent of the wide spacing and tonal purity of Copland's works, Moross brings his own accessible humor to the symphonic form." None other than Sir Thomas Beecham conducted the premiere of the symphony in Seattle in 1943.

Moross regularly challenged the status quo: His Gentlemen, Be Seated! received only three performances at New York's City Center Opera in 1963: its review of events during the Civil War, performed as a minstrel show, was too much for critics or audiences to handle as the civil-rights movement was reaching its height. He spent much of his last decade writing chamber music and turning Lucille Fletcher's radio play Sorry, Wrong Number into a one-act opera (1977).

Moross died on July 25, 1983.

Says Whitmer: "He consciously refused to be swayed by popular trends. He turned away from modernist techniques (such as serialism) early in his career and he never looked back. Instead Moross called on the music he heard around him for inspiration, including popular song – he had a great appreciation for Vernon Duke, who he met when he was quite young – and jazz heard in clubs. But Moross also had a vast knowledge and appreciation of classical music. With the exception of his ballet, Frankie and Johnny, Moross never relied on quoting from the American folk repertoire to sound 'American.' Because his music was inspired by American musical idioms, it was intrinsically American."

Moross's career is celebrated in a nationally syndicated two-hour special, Jerome Moross: "The Big Country" and Beyond, produced by the WFMT Radio Network and hosted by Michael Feinstein.

  NEWS & NOTEWORTHY

Thursday, August 28, 2015
Watch an exclusive video of Joyce DiDonato performing at Wigmore Hall singing Lazy Afternoon
click here>>>

Thursday, June 18, 2015
The golden touch
reviewed by John F. Karr
Here's a pair of new Broadway cast albums: one classic show is reconstructed, while another is deconstructed.
First is a recording I've been waiting for all my life, and I'm not kidding

To read more, click here>>>

To order your recording, click here>>>

"Shadows in the Night" Becomes Worldwide Hit
Jerome Moross/Carolyn Leigh Song “Stay With Me” is featured
Bob Dylan’s new album, Shadows In The Night, has debuted in the Top Ten in 13 countries spanning the globe, including #1 chart entries in the United Kingdom, Sweden and
Ireland, #2 in the Netherlands and Switzerland, #3 in Austria, Japan and Spain, #6 in Germany and Belgium, #8 in Finland and #10 in Canada. The album has also debuted at #7 in the United States, making it the artist’s 17th studio album to debut in the Top 10 in this country.

Among the songs on the album is “Stay With Me,” composed by Jerome Moross with lyrics by Carolyn Leigh. The song is included as an homage to Frank Sinatra who originally recorded it. To read more, click here>>>

One Song, Seven Questions
Through the Road Buckles Under
"STAY WITH ME"-Jerome Moross

"Stay with Me" has been in the news lately. No, I don't mean the song by Sam Smith that inadvertently rips off Tom Petty's "Won't Back Down," but the song of the same title that Bob Dylan sings on his new album, "Shadows in the Night." This "Stay with Me" was also released as a single and Dylan closed many of his concerts last year with it. To read more, Click here>>>

Sunday, February 8, 2015 at 7 PM
Musical Theatre Guild of Los Angeles has mounted a reading of the Moross/LaTouche musical, THE GOLDEN APPLE at the Moss Theater, 3131 Olympic Boulevard, Santa Monica, CA 90404
43 Member Cast and 36 Piece Orchestra Highlight 60-year Revival


The cast of 22 is directed by Michael Van Duzer with music direction by Richard Berent. Since 1995, Musical Theatre Guild has grown to become one of Southern California’s premiere theatre companies. MTG is the winner of the Los Angeles Drama Critics’ Circle Margaret Harford Award for Sustained Excellence.
In residence at Glendale’s historic Alex Theatre, MTG also presents an acclaimed in-school program in association with the Music Center Education Division. To See more information, Click here>>>

October 24-November 2, 2014
Lyric Stage Presents Jerome Moross and John Latouche’s THE GOLDEN APPLE, an opera for Broadway
43 Member Cast and 36 Piece Orchestra Highlight 60-year Revival
Lyric Stage Founding Producer Steven Jones announced the complete cast and crew of the company’s newest production THE GOLDEN APPLE the
Jerome Moross/John Latouche musical. The performances will be held on October 24, 25, 30, 31 and November 1 at 8:00 PM and October 26 and November 2 at 2:30 PM in the Irving Arts Center’s Carpenter Performance Hall, 3333 N. MacArthur Blvd, Irving, TX. To read more, Click here>>>

March 25, 2014
Picture Perfect
This week, WWFM, The Classical Network, on "Picture Perfect" hosted by Ross Amico will focus on Jerome Moross’s
western scores, including The Big Country, The Proud Rebel, The Jayhawkers and The Valley of Gwangi. The show will air this Friday evening, March 28, 2014 at 6. You can catch the streaming here: wwfm.org
If you miss it, the show will be archived as a webcast for the next few months here: wwfm.org/webcasts_picture_perfect.shtml

March 24, 2014
“THE BIG COUNTRY AND BEYOND” Online
Many thanks to the WFMT Radio Network for permission to archive the Moross 2-hour documentary produced by Jon Tolansky in the Moross.com Media section.
To listen to the Jerome Moross: "The Big Country and Beyond!” Click here>>>

If you or your organization has news or information of interest to our website visitors, please let us know.  Contact us at news@Moross.com.

 
 

© 2013 Susanna Moross Tarjan All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or use of material from this website is a violation of all applicable laws.